PADI Europe, Middle East and Africa

The Pavilions, Bridgwater Road, BS13 8AE Bristol
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Telephone +44 117 3007234
Fax +44 117 9710400
marketing.emea@padi.com

Location

Hall map

boot 2017 hall map (Hall 3): stand F28

Fairground map

boot 2017 fairground map: Hall 3

Our range of products

Product categories

  • 04  Services
  • 04.04  Training/Schools
  • 04.04.04  Other Training
  • 08  Diving
  • 08.02  Services (Diving)
  • 08.02.01  Diving Schools
  • 08  Diving
  • 08.02  Services (Diving)
  • 08.02.02  Diving Trips
  • 08  Diving
  • 08.02  Services (Diving)
  • 08.02.03  Diving Centers

Diving Centers

  • 08  Diving
  • 08.02  Services (Diving)
  • 08.02.04  Diving Media

Diving Media

  • 12  Organisations/Institutions/Clubs
  • 12.02  Sports Associations/Clubs
  • 12.02.06  Diving (Associations/Clubs)

Diving (Associations/Clubs)

Our products

Product category: Diving Schools

OPEN WATER DIVER

Who should take this course?
If you’ve always wanted to take scuba diving lessons, experience unparalleled adventure and see the world beneath the waves, this is where it starts. Get your scuba diving certification with the PADI Open Water Diver course – the world’s most popular and widely recognized scuba course. Millions of people have learned to scuba dive and gone on to discover the wonders of the aquatic world through this course.

To enroll in a PADI Open Water Diver course (or Junior Open Water Diver course), you must be 10 years old or older. You need adequate swimming skills and need to be in good physical health. No prior experience with scuba diving is required.

What will you learn?
The PADI Open Water Diver course consists of three main phases:

  • Knowledge Development ( online, independent study or in a classroom) to understand basic principles of scuba diving
  • Confined Water Dives to learn basic scuba skills
  • Open Water Dives to use your skills and explore!
  • You may be able to  get college credit for the Open Water Diver course.

Short on time? The  PADI Scuba Diver course might be right for you.

How can you start learning now?
Enroll in Open Water Diver Online – PADI’s eLearning option – and you can start learning right away. PADI Open Water Diver Online gives you the background information you need to dive safely and allows you to study at your own pace through an interactive computer-based program. Get started now!

You can also start learning with PADI’s home-study materials – Open Water Diver TouchTM (a tablet app) or the Open Water Diver Manual and Open Water Diver Video (a book and DVD package). Stop by your local PADI dive shop to enroll in the course, get your materials and start reading the book and watching the video. Your PADI Instructor will schedule time with you to check your progress and make sure you understand important scuba diving information.

What scuba gear will you use?
In the PADI Open Water Diver course, you learn to use basic scuba gear, including a mask, snorkel, fins, regulator, buoyancy control device and a tank. The equipment you wear varies, depending upon whether you’re diving in tropical, temperate or cold water.

Check with your local dive center about the gear you’ll use during this course and get advice about everything you need from your PADI Instructor.

Next Step
Breathing underwater for the first time is something you’ll never forget, so don’t wait.

  • Sign up for  Open Water Diver Online and start learning right away.
  • Enroll in a PADI Open Water Diver course at your local  PADI Dive Center or Resort.
  • Try scuba diving with the  Discover Scuba Diving program.
  • Download a Medical Statement and Questionnaire (pdf).
  • Browse the  scuba certification FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions).

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Product category: Diving Trips

YOUR NEXT SCUBA DIVING ADVENTURE

Your Next Dive Adventure
As a certified scuba diver you’ve already experienced the thrill of exploring parts of the underwater world, but know there’s more to discover. Whether you’re looking for new dive adventures, to improve your scuba skills, or both at once, taking another PADI dive course will help you gain more confidence and meet more dive buddies.

PADI Advanced Open Water Diver Course
In the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course, there’s a long list of scuba specialty dives to try. Fish identification, boat diving, altitude diving, drift diving, sidemount diving, search and recovery, wreck diving, plus about 12 more. You do five different dives all under the expert guidance of your PADI Instructor. No formal classroom session, just a lot of diving. You can start learning online with PADI eLearning® and even get credit for your dives toward the related PADI Specialty Diver course. Short on time? Try the PADI Adventure Diver course, a subset of the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course.

PADI Specialty Diver Courses
If you already know what type of specialty diving interests you – underwater photography, wreck diving, deep diving etc. – then sign up for that PADI Specialty Diver course. Specialty diver courses teach you the right way to  have special dive adventures, so you don’t have to learn on your own. Who wants to night dive for the first time without a PADI Instructor by your side? You may even get credit for dives toward your Advanced Open Water Diver certification and you can start the Digital Underwater Photographer and Enriched Air Diver courses online – now.

PADI Rescue Diver Course
Being more confident in the water is what every diver desires and the PADI Rescue Diver course will help you get there. It also teaches you to be a better buddy. During the course, you learn how to spot potential problems and quickly deal with them before they become big issues. You’ll be ready to rescue someone in an emergency, but you’ll also have the skills and awareness to prevent problems. For many, earning a PADI Rescue Diver certification is the start of a career in diving.

PADI Master Scuba Diver Rating
Be a diver that others look up to! If you have the passion and want to join the best of the best in recreational scuba diving, then make the Master Scuba Diver rating your goal. The Master Scuba Diver rating places you in an elite group of respected divers who have earned this rating through both significant experience and scuba training.

Divers must complete the PADI Open Water Diver course, followed by the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver and PADI Rescue Diver , earn five PADI Specialty Diver certifications and have logged a minimum of 50 dives. Fewer than two percent of divers ever achieve this rating! When you flash your Master Scuba Diver card, people know that you’ve spent time underwater in a variety of environments and had your share of dive adventures.

  • Start on your next dive adventure:
  • Continue your education now with PADI eLearning.
  • Dive in with a  PADI Dive Center or Resort to take a continued education course.
  • Download a  Keep Diving Guide.
  • Check out  scuba diving vacations.
  • Browse the  PADI Course Catalog.

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Product category: Other Training, Diving Schools

DIVEMASTER COURSE

Who should take this course?
Love scuba diving? Want to share it with others on a whole new level? Take the PADI Divemaster course and do what you love to do as a career. Scuba divers look up to divemasters because they are leaders who mentor and motivate others. As a divemaster, you not only get to dive a lot, but also experience the joy of seeing others have as much fun diving as you do.

The PADI Divemaster course is your first level of professional training. Working closely with a PADI Instructor, you’ll fine-tune your dive skills, like perfecting the effortless hover, and refine your rescue skills so you anticipate and easily solve common problems. You’ll gain dive knowledge, management and supervision abilities so you become a role model to divers everywhere. 

As a PADI Divemaster, you’ll lead others as you supervise scuba diving activities and assist with diver training. Whether you want to work at a faraway dive destination or close to home at a local dive shop, the adventure of a lifetime awaits you. PADI Divemasters are respected dive professionals who are aligned with the largest and most respected dive organization in the world – PADI.

PADI Rescue Divers who are at least 18 years old may enroll in the PADI Divemaster course. You also need to have:

  • Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care (CPR and First Aid) training within the past 24 months.
  • A medical statement signed by a physician within the last 12 months.
  • At least 40 logged dives to begin the course and 60 dives to earn certification.
Note that qualifying certifications from other diver training organization may apply – ask your PADI Instructor.

What will you learn?
The PADI Divemaster course teaches you to be a leader and take charge of dive activities. Through knowledge development sessions, waterskills exercises and workshops, and hands-on practical assessment, you develop the skills to organize and direct a variety of scuba diving activities. Topics and practical workshops include:

  • The role and characteristics of the PADI Divemaster
  • Supervising dive activities and assisting with student divers
  • Diver safety and risk management
  • Divemaster conducted programs and specialized skills
  • Business of diving and your career
  • Awareness of the dive environment
  • Dive setup and management
  • Mapping an open water site
  • Conducting dive briefings
  • Organizing a search and recovery project and a deep dive
  • Conducting a scuba review and skin diver course
  • Assisting with Discover Scuba Diving and leading Discover Local Diving programs
Your instructor may also offer the PADI Deep Diver and Search and Recovery Diver specialty diver courses along with your divemaster training to help you meet all requirements and to broaden your abilities.

You may be able to get college credit for the Divemaster course – ask your instructor.

How can you start learning now?
Sign up for Divemaster Online – PADI’s eLearning option – to start now. You can work through eight knowledge development sections using a web-based system that lets you learn at your own pace. You also have access to an online version of the Divemaster Manual for reference during and after the course.

Another option is to study by reading the Divemaster Manual and watching the Divemaster Video (a book and DVD package). Visit your local PADI Dive Center or Resort to enroll in the course and get your Divemaster Crew-Pak, which also includes other reference materials – like the PADI Instructor Manual and The Encyclopedia of Recreational Diving – that you’ll need during the course.

Consider taking Dive Theory Online, another PADI eLearning® program, that takes you step-by-step through dive physics, physiology, skills, equipment and environment, plus a Recreational Dive Planner (RDP) review. By successfully completing Dive Theory Online, you can get credit for half of the Divemaster Final Exam. Your PADI Instructor can explain how this works when you meet to schedule knowledge review sessions along with your waterskills exercises, workshops and practical assessments.

What scuba gear will you use?
As a dive professional, you’ll want to have all your basic scuba equipment, including a dive computer, a dive knife, and at least two surface signaling devices. During practical skills exercises, like underwater mapping and search and recovery, you’ll use a compass, floats, marker buoys, lift bags and slates. Your PADI Instructor may suggest additional gear that will be useful throughout your diving career.

Check with your local dive center to get advice about everything you’ll need as a dive pro.

Next Step
Go PROSM and earn your next certification:

  • Register for Divemaster Online and start learning right away.
  • Sign up for Dive Theory Online.
  • Enroll in a PADI Divemaster course at your PADI Dive Center or Resort.
  • Browse the PADI Course Catalog.
  • Download a Medical Statement and Questionnaire (pdf).

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Product category: Other Training, Diving Schools

TECHNICAL DIVING COURSE OFFERINGS

Technical Diving
Technical (tec) diving means going beyond recreational scuba diving limits. But, tec divers will tell you that it’s really about the challenge and adventure of exploring places that no one else has ever seen. Tec diving is not for everyone, but it does attract experienced divers who want to go beyond their current limits and are willing to accept the added risks, training, investment and commitment it demands. If this is you, then PADI TecRec courses are your ticket to extreme adventure.

What is technical diving?
Technical scuba diving involves going beyond recreational scuba diving limits and includes one or more of the following:

  • Diving beyond 40 metres/130 feet
  • Required stage decompression
  • Diving in an overhead environment beyond 40 linear metres/130 linear feet of the surface
  • Accelerated decompression and/or the use of variable gas mixtures during the dive
  • Use of extensive equipment and technologies
In technical diving the surface is often inaccessible in an emergency, so tec divers use extensive procedures, equipment and training to manage the added risks and potential hazards. Although founded on extensive open-circuit scuba technology, tec diving has been revolutionized by the development, availability and reliability of closed circuit rebreathers (CCRs). CCRs have numerous benefits and provide tec divers with significantly more time underwater.

The PADI TecRec Difference
PADI TecRec courses are the quality benchmarks in the tec diving world due to their rigorous, yet logical, training sequence and the PADI educational materials that support them. TecRec courses are instructionally valid and have a seamless course flow that takes you from a new tec diver to one qualified to dive to the outer reaches of sport diving. Each level introduces you to new gear and procedures to extend your dive limits.

Technical Diver Courses
Discover Tec
Tec 40
Tec 45
Tec 50
Tec Trimix 65
Tec Trimix Diver
Tec Gas Blender
Tec Sidemount
Discover Rebreather
Rebreather Diver
Advanced Rebreather Diver
Rebreather Qualifier
Rebreather Refresher
Tec 40 CCR
Tec 60 CCR
Tec 100 CCR
Tec CCR Qualifier
Tec CCR Refresher

Technical Instructor Courses
Tec Instructor
Tec Deep Instructor
Tec Sidemount Instructor
Tec Gas Blender Instructor
Tec Trimix Instructor
Tec 40 CCR Instructor
Tec 60 CCR Instructor
Tec 100 CCR Instructor

Why would I want to be a tec diver?
Many spectacular, untouched wrecks lie at depths well below 40 metres/130 feet. Deep reefs have organisms you don’t find in the shallows. Some people enjoy the challenge and focus tec diving requires. Still others love being involved with cutting edge technologies. These reasons make tec diving rewarding.

However, you can be an accomplished, avid top-notch diver your entire life without making a tec dive. Tec diving does require significantly more effort, discipline and equipment, which means it’s not for everyone.

How long has technical diving been around?
Explorers have always developed new techniques and equipment to extend the range of their adventures, and divers are no different. By the early 1990s, several groups of divers around the world began experimenting with technologies for deep diving beyond recreational limits to explore both caves and wrecks. These communities united and emerged as “technical diving”. Since then, tec diving continues to develop both in scope and in its technologies.

See what technical divers have to say. . .
Visit the TecRec Blog.

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Product category: Other Training, Diving Schools

DIGITAL UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHER

Who should take this course?
Underwater photography is one of the most popular diving specialties, and with so many underwater cameras to choose from, it has become easier and more fun than ever to capture images of your underwater scuba adventures. The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer course gets you going quickly, whether you use a point-and-shoot camera or a sophisticated dSLR like the pros.

PADI (Junior) Open Water Divers who are at least 10 years old are eligible to take the Digital Underwater Photographer course.

Because underwater photography is also popular with snorkelers, there is an option for avid snorkelers and skin divers to complete the course. Check with your PADI Dive Center or Resort if this interests you.

What will you learn?
Through hands-on training during two scuba dives and guidance from your PADI Professional, you’ll discover:

  • How to choose the right underwater camera system for you.
  • The PADI SEA (Shoot, Examine, Adjust) method for getting great shots quickly.
  • Principles for good composition of underwater images.
  • Practical techniques to take great photos with your digital camera.
Get credit! The second dive of this PADI Specialty Diver course may credit as an Adventure Dive toward your Advanced Open Water Diver certification – ask your instructor about earning credit.

How can you start learning now?
Sign up for Digital Underwater Photographer Online – PADI’s eLearning option – to get started immediately. The web-based system guides you through the principles of great underwater photography, with a bonus section on underwater imaging (including video). You study at your own pace through an easy-to-use, interactive program. You also have access to an online version of the Digital Underwater Photographer Manual.

You can also choose to read the paper version of the Digital Underwater Photographer Manual. Stop by your local PADI Dive Center and Resort to enroll in the course, get your materials and start learning. Your PADI Professional will meet with you to schedule knowledge review sessions along with your dives.

What scuba gear will you use?
Beyond using basic scuba equipment, you’ll need a digital underwater camera and a computer or other device for downloading and viewing your images. Your PADI Pro may suggest additional equipment and accessories depending on your camera system. Visit your local dive center to get advice about everything you need for your underwater photography adventures.

Next Step
Shoot like a pro and earn your next certification:

  • Sign up for Digital Underwater Photographer Online and start learning right away.
  • Enroll in a PADI Digital Underwater Photographer course at your PADI Dive Center or Resort.
  • Browse the PADI Course Catalog.
  • Check out the PADI Master Scuba Diver rating.

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About us

Company details

The PADI Story – Two Friends, a Bottle of Scotch and an Idea

The world’s largest scuba diving training organization, PADI was dreamed up in 1966 by two friends in Illinois over a bottle of Johnnie Walker. It’s true.

John Cronin, a scuba equipment salesman for U.S. Divers, and Ralph Erickson, an educator and swimming instructor, were concerned about the scuba diving industry. They felt that the scuba certification agencies that existed at the time were unprofessional, didn’t use state-of-the-art instruction, and made it unnecessarily difficult for people to enter the sport. John and Ralph knew there had to be a safer, easier way for people to learn to breathe underwater.

In 1966, John brought a bottle of Johnnie Walker Black Label and $30 US to Ralph’s Illinois apartment in Morton Grove. They decided it was time to start a scuba training organization. John insisted that the word “professional” be in the name of the company. Ralph wanted an “association of diving instructors.” After a few rounds of Scotch, the acronym PADI was born: Professional Association of Diving Instructors.

Their goal – give more people a chance to enjoy the underwater world by offering relevant, instructionally valid scuba diving training to create confident scuba divers who dive regularly.

The Underground Office
The initial start-up meetings took place at several restaurants in Morton Grove and Niles, Illinois. In a few months, Cronin finished a portion of the basement in his home on Main Street in Niles to become the headquarters for PADI. He eventually hired his next-door neighbor to be a part time secretary. His son, Brian, stuffed and sealed envelopes.

A Torched Logo
When they were struggling for a logo design, John mentioned he wanted something classy like the National Geographic look. Years later, in an interview, Ralph said that idea changed the way he was looking at this small two-man operation. At that moment, he could see a big vision for PADI. Ralph was responsible for putting together the first PADI logo – a diver with a torch in a globe. This logo was later refined into the well-known PADI logo of today.

PADI Grows
In the early years, PADI grew slowly. In 1967, it introduced recreational diving’s first diver certification requirements, first advanced diver course and first specialty diver programs. By the late 1960s, PADI had 400 members, but it was still a struggling entity.

Cronin went to a huge National Sporting Goods Association show in New York City. While he was there he met with Paul Tzimoulis, who later became the editor of Skin Diver magazine. Paul suggested that PADI put the diver’s picture on the certification card. In 1968, PADI produced the first positive identification certification card with the diver’s photograph. It was a strategic move that helped PADI’s eventual global recognition.

John Cronin had been promoted to Sales Manager at U.S. Divers and had moved the family to Huntington Beach, California. In 1970, the PADI Office moved to California, USA.

Erickson developed a modular training program and it started to catch on. In 1972, the PADI Open Water Diver certification was launched as the preferred entry-level rating, with twice as many required open water dives as previous courses.

In the late 1970s and early ‘80s, PADI began creating its own integrated, multimedia student and instructor educational materials for each course. This development spawned an incredible growth period for PADI and made it unique from other agencies.

By the late 1980s, PADI was the leading scuba diving training organization in the world. With so many new people introduced to the activity, everyone at PADI felt a responsibility to teach divers about their interactions with the underwater world. Cronin knew PADI had a responsibility to protect the marine environment. John Cronin said:

“We want to feel that our children, their children and generations to come will be able to enjoy the underwater world that has given us so much. There are so many significant problems facing mankind, but as divers this is truly our cause. If scuba divers do not take an active role in preserving the aquatic realm, who will?”

Out of a true concern for the environment, the Project AWARE Foundation was formed.

PADI Today
In 2003, John Cronin passed away. His friend and PADI co-founder, Ralph Erickson, passed away three years later. They proudly carried PADI’s torch for many years before they confidently put it in the hands of today’s generation of PADI Professionals, who continue to introduce the world to scuba diving.

With close to 400 employees in PADI corporate offices around the world, the PADI organization works hard to be the best partner to its members and is committed to:

  1. Safe and responsible diver acquisition and retention.
  2. Quality member acquisition and retention.
  3. Financial prosperity.
  4. Worldwide alignment in message, products, systems and procedures.
The PADI Worldwide Executive team, led by Dr. Drew Richardson, President and CEO, ensure these promises are met.
PADI’s Mission
  • Purpose – PADI exists to develop programs that encourage and fulfill the public interest in recreational scuba diving and snorkeling worldwide.
  • Vision – PADI intends to be the world leader in the educational development of scuba diving professionals and enthusiasts.
  • Slogan – PADI – The Way the World Learns to Dive®
  • Mission – We want to teach the world to scuba dive.
  • Tasks, Goals and Purposes – PADI strives to be the world’s most respected and successful organization in recreational scuba diving and snorkeling. PADI is committed to product and service excellence, the professional growth and security of PADI Members and employees, healthy competition and partnership within the dive industry, and to providing training and opportunity for all who seek to enjoy and safely explore and protect our planet’s oceans, lakes and waterways.

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